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Calendar >  “Beyond King Tut Immersive Experience” Is Visually Stunning

“Beyond King Tut Immersive Experience” Is Visually Stunning

By   /  February 9, 2023  /  No Comments

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TR Robertson -The next best thing to a trip to Egypt to see the King Tut artifacts and tomb is a trip to the Del Mar Fairgrounds to take in the “Beyond King Tut Immersive Experience” to see this dramatic, cinematic, immersive presentation of the life and death of this boy king in what has been called one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of all time. Using a “multi-gallery, multi-sensory story-telling approach” to bring the 3,300-year-old tale of King Tut to life, those attending will wander through 6 rooms created in the massive Wyland Center at the Del Mar Fairgrounds and watch the life of Tut unfold from the discovery of the tomb to his final resting place in the Valley of the Kings.

The exhibit commemorates the 100th anniversary of the discovery of King Tut’s tomb, discovered by Howard Carter on November 4, 1922.

King Tutankhamun became pharaoh in 1332 B.C. at age 9 when Pharaoh Akhenaten died. During his reign he restored the traditional polytheistic religion of Egypt, one with numerous deities. He also moved the capital of Egypt from Amarna to Memphis. Tut died at age 19, the exact cause of death unknown. He died so young an elaborate tomb or temple could not be constructed, so he was buried in a smaller tomb dug in the Valley of the Kings. This would lead to why his tomb was not discovered until 1922. Tut’s tomb was actually broken into shortly after his burial with nothing of significance stolen, perhaps the grave robbers were apprehended. For over 3,300 years the treasures of King Tut remained undiscovered. The primary reason is debris covered the steps leading down to Tut’s tomb, falling from the slopes above and possibly from other tombs in the area. Egyptologist Howard Carter had spent 8 years in the Valley of the Kings searching for treasure of pharaohs. Financed by George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon, Carter was set to stop his digs in the Valley of the Kings until one auspicious day in November of 1922, one of his workers saw what looked like two steps leading down with stones and debris covering the remaining steps. As a team of Carter’s workers began removing the debris, it became clear that a series of steps led to a sealed entrance. What would eventually be discovered has been called the greatest Egyptian discovery of all time and one of the greatest discoveries of all time in the field of archaeology. It took Carter 10 years of cataloging what was in the tomb and has revealed 5,398 artifacts, including the most elaborate series of Egyptian sarcophagus ever found.

Years ago, I was fortunate to see a collection of many of the treasurers found in the tomb that were part of a traveling exhibition stopping in several cities in the United States. Items like the famous death mask, Tut’s chariot and the golden chair were part of the burial items on display in Los Angeles. Carolyn and I have also been fortunate to have traveled to Egypt twice and saw the treasures of Tut in the National Museum of Antiquity in Cairo and as part of a trip down the Nile we stopped by the Valley of the Kings, walked through the valley and were able to go into Tut’s tomb and see the large golden sarcophagus inside of the stone sarcophagus Howard Carter had found. The Grand Egyptian Museum, set to soon open and replace the old museum, is said to plan on displaying the majority of the items found in the tomb. Supposedly, King Tut’s artifacts will not leave Egypt ever again.

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  • Published: 1 year ago on February 9, 2023
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  • Last Modified: February 9, 2023 @ 10:03 pm
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